Best Preserved Frontier Fort in the West - Fort Larned Old Guard Newsletter

May 1 --- General Hancock met Satanta at Fort Larned. Dispatch from Stanley:

     The last and most important "talk" with the Indian chiefs took place at Larned [today]. Satanta, the chief of the Kiowas, appeared in person, accompanied by a small and select body of lesser chiefs. . . . His figure is large, and very muscular, showing great strength, and at the council was adorned in a unique manner, the colour of red predominating. As he stood before the glittering council, his sharp, brilliant eyes wandered incessantly around the circle.

     Appearing with his body painted a brilliant red, Satanta, the "Orator of the Plains," spoke for peace:

     I want the Great Father at Washington, and all the soldiers and troops to hold on. I don't want the prairies and country to be bloody, but just hold on for a while. I don't want war at all; I want peace. As for the Kiowas talking war, I don't know anything about it. Nor do I know anything about the Comanches, Cheyennes, and Sioux talking about war. The Cheyennes, Kiowas, and Comanches are poor. They are all of the same color. They are all red men. The country here is old, and it all belongs to them. . .

     I have nothing bad hidden in my breast at all; everything is all right there. I have heard that there are many troops coming out in this country to whip the Cheyennes and that is the reason we were afraid, and went away. The Cheyennes, Arapahoes, and Kiowas heard that there were troops coming out in this country; so also the Comanches and Apaches, but do not whether they were coming for peace or for war. They were on the lookout, and listening, and hearing from down out of the ground all the time. They were afraid to come in.

     I don't think the Cheyennes wanted to fight, but I understand you burned their village. I don't think that was good at all. To you, General, and to all these officers sitting around here, I say that I know that whatever I tell you will be sent to Washington, and I don't want anything but the truth told. . . .

     Hancock was so impressed with the chief's speech he presented him with a major general's coat and yellow sash. The Kiowa left in a blaze of color.

May 2 --- Special Orders, No. 51, signed by Captain Asbury:

     A detail to consist of One Sergeant, One Corporal and Eight Privates of the 10th U.S. Cavalry will proceed on the Santa Fe road as far as Fort Zarah Kansas in order to apprehend deserters from the 7th U.S. Cavalry. The detachment will stop at Fort Zarah and return as escort for the next stage of the Overland Mail Company.

May 3 --- Letter from Captain Asbury to the adjutant general, U.S. Army:

     I have the honor to transmit herewith application of Mr Theo. Weichelbaum for the Position of Post Trader at Fort Larned Kas

Letter from Captain Asbury to the assistant adjutant general, District of the Upper Arkansas:

     I have the honor to report that Co "A" 10th US Cavalry Capt N Nolan Commanding arrived at this Post on the 30th ult and have reported for duty also that Co "K" 37th US Infantry Bvt Capt Jno Thompson Comdy arrived the same day and have reported for duty

Second Letter from Captain Asbury to the assistant adjutant general, District of the Upper Arkansas, same date:

     In compliance with General Orders No 62 senis [?] 1866 Hd Qr Dept of the Mo. I have the honor to make the following report

     Trains have passed this Post during the month of April 1867 as follows.

April 5th     50 wagons and 62 armed men going East

April 8th      25 wagons and 31 armed men going East

April 11th     23 wagons and 32 armed men going West

April 12th     42 wagons and 63 armed men going West

April 14th     25 wagons and 31 armed men going East

April 15th     11 wagons and 13 armed men going West

April 16th     16 wagons and 41 armed men going East

April 18th     100 wagons and 121 armed men going East

April 19th     25 wagons and 31 armed men going East

April 20th     10 wagons and 33 armed men going East

April 21st     23 wagons and 30 armed men going East

April 26th     27 wagons and 30 armed men going East

April 29th     7 wagons and 9 armed men going East

April 30th     28 wagons and 38 armed men going East

Letter from Captain Asbury to Major Easton:

     I have the honor to request information on the following points

     Are Civilian Employes entitled to receive an allowance of Fuel from the Q.M. Department?

     Also whether the employes are to work Eight [8] or Ten [10] hours per diem?

May 4 --- Letter from 2nd Lieutenant G. W. Raulston, Post Adjutant, to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri, in the field:

     The Bvt Maj Commanding directs me to say that a Cheyenne Indian came into this Post today from Black Kettles Band of Cheyenne Indians and states that Black Kettle wishes to come to this Post for the purpose of holding a council. I have directed the Indian to stop with his Agent [Col. Wynkoop] until I hear from the Maj Gen. Commanding.

May 5 --- After spending two days at Fort Hays, General Hancock marched to Fort Harker. He then returned to Fort Leavenworth, his ill---timed campaign over.

Special Orders, No. 56, signed by Lieutenant Raulston:

     Company "A" 10th U.S. Cavalry, will hereafter, until further orders, practice at target, firing, using one round of ammunition per man each day.

May 9 --- Letter from Lieutenant Raulston to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri, in the field:

     The Bvt Maj. Commanding directs me to say that upon the receipt of your communication, he interrogated the Cheyenne Indian messenger from "Black Kettle" with the following result

     1. It is twelve nights since he left Black Kettle, and he has been here five days

     2. He has seen Black Kettle since Smith left the village but left the same day as Smith

     3. Black Kettle was in same locality as he was when Smith left

     4. He [Black Kettle] intended to move north as soon as his horses were in order

     5. They had heard of no trouble with the whites when he left but had heard that there were troops coming for the purpose of making trouble

     6. Says that Black Kettle sent no message to Col Wynkoop in reference to trouble with the whites

     7. States that Black Kettle said he would come to this Post himself as soon as the village had moved

     8. States that they intend to move their camp to below and near where they met Col Wynkoop last winter on Bluff Creek some seventy or eighty miles below Fort Larned

     9. As soon as Black Kettle had reached Bluff Creek it was intention to come himself to this Post

     10. They will move as soon as the horses get in order as they are now constantly giving out on the way.

May 10 --- Letter from Captain Asbury to the adjutant general, U.S. Army:

     I have the honor to make the following report[.] Bvt Lieut Col J.B. McIntyre Major 3d US Cavalry died at this Post at 6 OClock A.M. today of Phthisis PhImoralis [?] whilst enroute to join his command

     Maj McIntyre arrived at this Post on the 30th April 1867 and remained here until his decease

Letter from Captain Asbury to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri, in the field:

     I have the honor to make the following report.

     Four Mexicans, named respectfully, Juanrocilla Lleguacanela, Meyreaballo and Andadera, arrived at this Post this morning, and report having been fired upon at the lower Cimaron crossing, by Seven [7] Indians, supposed to have been Arrapahoes, who ran of[f] their horses four [4] in number

May 12 --- Letter from Captain Asbury to Major Henry Douglass, 3rd U.S. Infantry, commanding Fort Dodge:

     I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your communication dated May 4th 1867 and in reply would respectfully state that the detail of one [1] non-Commissioned Officer and nine men will proceed to the station at Big Coon Creek, by the first Mail. I would further state that Co "K" 37th Infry is insufficient to furnish Three details going West, when only one arrives from the West. I would suggest that the Coaches be detained at this Post, as at Fort Dodge.

     P.S. We have no potatoes at this Post.

May 13 --- Letter from Thomas Murphy, Superintendent of the Central Indian Superintendency, Atchison, to Commissioner Taylor, Washington:

     I have the honor to inform you that Agent Leavenworth arrived here yesterday, direct from his agency. I had a conference with him yesterday relative to Indian affairs and military operations in the South West. He gave me much valuable information, [and] permitted me to peruse all the correspondence he has had with Genl. Hancock and other military dignataries. If his statements are correct [and I have no reason to doubt them] Genl. Hancocks expedition, I regret to say, has resulted in no good, but on the contrary has been productive of much evil. It would have been far better for the interest of all concerned had he never entered the Indian Country with his soldiers. Indians who at the time he got into their Country were peaceable and well disposed towards the whites, are now fleeing with their women and children no one knows where to, and what the final result will be is doubtful.

     In such times and while such a state of uncertainty exists, I deemed it proper that the Agents of these Indians should be at some place where they could advise and council with them. I so informed Agent Leavenworth and directed that he return and put himself in communication with his Indians, this he said he would do---but in order to accomplish this he will have to proceed to the mouth of the Little Arkansas, and from that point sent out runners to his Indians, before returning he will report in detail to the Dept. all the particulars relating to recent events connected with himself and his Indians.

May 14 --- Special Orders, No. 60, signed by Lieutenant Raulston:

     1st Lieut A Kaiser 3d US Infantry A.A.Q.M. will transfer Twenty-two [22] Spades, Twenty-two [22] Pick-axes, Twenty-two [22] Pick-axe helves, Twenty-two [22] Axes and Twenty-two [22] axe-helves from the returns of Camp and Garrison Equipage to the returns of Quartermasters Stores.

May 15 --- Letter from Captain Asbury to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri:

     I have the honor to make the following report.

     "Black Bird" a chief of the Kiowas came into this Post on the 13th inst, accompanied by 11 Warriors and squaws. The following is the substance of a "talk" held with them.

     The Kiowas, Comanches and a portion of the Arrapahoes and Apaches, went to occupy the territory south of the Arkansas river.The above mentioned tribes are encamped at present on the Salt Plains---All are for peace---The chiefs of the tribes have held a cou[n]cil and are for peace---The chiefs of these tribes have talked to the Sioux and Cheyenne and want them to keep quiet but it was of no use---They [Sioux and Cheyenne] talked all last winter, that they would make war for a short time and then come in to make another treaty---The Cheyennes were camped last winter with the Kiowas---The largest portion of the Arrapahoes are in Texas at present---if any Indians approach the Post direct from the south, they will be Kiowas Comanches Arrapahoes or Apaches and it would be well to meet them as friends---They are afraid the soldiers will cross the Arkansas river and they do not want them there.---"Tall Bull" [Cheyenne] has crossed the Platte River at the old California crossing to join the Sioux and he says that as soon as the northern bands horses get in order, that they are coming back for the and property that they lost.

     The Kiowas have tried to stop them but it was of no use, but that they [Kiowas] will come in often and give us the news, and in return they want plenty of rations---A large part of the Arrapahoes have gone with "Black Kettle"---Some of the Kiowas have gone into Fort Dodge to see Major Douglass, they started the day after those that are here left their camp.---The Kiowas are now getting together to make their "Big Medecine" after which they will separate into small bands and stay south of the Arkansas River

     This party came in for the purpose of finding out if the report brought to them by Satanta was true.

     A party of Mexicans came into the Post and report that at a point some 200 miles from here on the Arkansas, on the south side, the Kiowas ran off 18 horses 6 mules and 8 oxen

     But from the manner in which they informed me of the circumstance I place no faith in the statement.

May 17 --- Letter from Captain Asbury to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri:

    I have the honor to report that Co "K" 3d US Infantry Bvt Capt James Thompson 1t Lieut 37th US Infantry Commanding arrived at this Post on the 30th day of April 1867 and reported for duty

     Also that Co "A" 10th US Cavalry Capt. N. Nolan arrived the same day and reported for duty

     I would state further that I reported the arrival of these Troops to the HdQrs Dist of the Upper Arkansas.

Letter from Captain Asbury to Major Douglass, Fort Dodge:

     In reply to your endorsement on my communication of May 15th I would state that the papers in question were two sealed communications from Hd Qrs Dept of the Mo in the Field sent to me by messengers with the request that I would forward them to you by first mail and receive an acknowledgement from you for them, which I would transmit to Hd Qrs.

     I am under the impression that they refered to the "talk" held with "Satanta" at this Post by Genl Hancock, at least one of them

May 18 --- Special Orders, No. 62, signed by Lieutenant Raulston:

     Capt N. Nolan 10th US Cavalry and a detail to consist of Three [3] Non Com Officers and Twenty-two [22] Privates 3d US Infantry and One [1] Non Com Officer and Seven [7] Privates 10th US Cavalry will proceed to Fort Dodge Ks as escort to Genl Marcey Inspector General U.S.A.

May 19 --- Letter from Captain Asbury to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri:

     I have the honor to report that Major Kidd 10th US Cavl. arrived at this Post on the 18th inst.

     Also that Genl Marcy Inspector General USA arrived at this Post on the 18th Inst and departed this A.M. enroute for Santa Fe N.M. accompanied by recruits for 3d and 37th Regts US Infty under charge of Lieut J.W. Hannay 3d US Infantry

May 22 --- Letter from Major Meredith Helm Kidd, 10th U.S. Cavalry, commanding Fort Larned, to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri:

     I have the honor to make the following report.

     Sitamon and another, and two squaws, Kiowas, came into the Post today and report as follows.

     The main band of Kiowas, under "Lone Wolf" and other chiefs, are camped on Crooked Creek below the bluff.

     The Apaches are camped there also.

     "One-eyed-ten-bears of the Comanches is also there with his band, 100 miles from here. Black Kettles band of Cheyennes are camped on the east side of the Witchitaw Mountains on some tributary of the Canadian river between 200 and 300 miles from here. The largest part of the Arrapahoes are also there, also the Codoes and "Old Crow" with the southern band of Comanches. "Little Raven" and a small band of Arrapahoes are on Crooked Creek about 50 miles from Dodge

     The Kiowas do not intend to come up to the Arkansas river but will stay where they are

May 25 --- Letter from Major Kidd to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri:

     I have the honor to make the following report

     Timber Mountain with one man and two squaws came in to the Post to day. Timber Mountain says:

     "The Kiowas are for peace. Different parties of them have gone in to the different Posts to say this and see how things are going on. They want to keep the Arkansas River and Santa [Fe] Road clear and want no depredations committed on them

     They do not intend to come north of the River.

     All the Indians south of the Arkansas are at peace.

     Since General Hancock burnt the Cheyenne village, none of the Cheyennes have gone south of the River except Three [3] Squaws who came to the Kiowa village on foot and in a starving condition. All the other Cheyennes have gone north. The Kiowas will come in [to the] Post to report every thing that occurs south of the river, and also to find out what is going on, in order to know what to do. If they ever see any troops south of the Arkansas they will come to them with a white flag, and report who they are, and where their villages are." "I speak the truth"

     Timber Mountain makes the same report of the Situation of the different villages are tribes as was reported in my last letter.

May 31 --- Special Orders, No. 74, signed by 2nd Lieutenant Harry Gibbons Cavenaugh, 37th U.S. Infantry:

     A Board of Examination is hereby detailed to examine into and report upon the circumstances attending the death of David Williams[,] Citizen Employe at this Post, on the night of May 30th 1867.

     Detail for the Board---Bvt Major H. Asbury Capt 3d US Infantry.

June 4 --- Letter from Major Kidd to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri:

     I have the honor to report that Three [3] Companies 37th Infantry, commanded by Bvt Maj Rzika, Capt. 37th Infantry[,] arrived at this Post on the 1st day of June 1867, enroute for New Mexico, and departed this morning at 6 A.M.

June 8 --- Letter from Agent Wynkoop, Fort Larned, to Superintendent Murphy, Atchison:

     I have the honor to transmit a copy of letter [dated second ?] showing the whereabouts at present of my Indians; as it is uncertain where I will be able to congregate the Indians for the purposes of issuing the Goods, you will please have them shipped direct to my Agency at Fort Larned. [I furnish ?] by next mail a detailed report of all matters connected with Gen. Hancocks Expedition together with an account of my investigation of an Indian outrage committed near Fort Dodge on the 4th inst.

June 11 --- Letter from Agent Wynkoop to Superintendent Murphy:

     I have the honor to transmit in accordance with instructions from office a Report of the details of Maj. Gen. Hancocks late opperation with reference to the Indians of my Agency. My first intimation of his intended expedition was a communication from him, of date March 11th 1867 a copy of which I enclose, marked A---the next communication with reference to the same matter was that of March 22d 1867, a copy of which I also enclose marked B.

     In accordance with the request of Gen. Hancock I communicated with the Indians of my Agency and instructed the principal men to be present at Fort Larned on the 11th day of April for the purpose of holding a council; in consequence of a severe snow storm they were detained several days but finally made their appearance although their animals were in such condition as to be scarcely able to travel.---A council was held, and at its close Gem Hancock expressed his intention to march his column up to their village a distance of thirty-five miles from Fort Larned, which he accordingly proceeded to do; the Indians were dissatisfied with this movement expressing themselves to the effect that it was calculated to frighten their women and children who had not forgotten the fearful massacre at Sand Creek. I stated to Gen. Hancock that I thought that such would be the result viz:,---frightening the women and children; by marching his column up to the village, but he did not change his intention.

     I accompanied the Expedition for the purpose of looking out for the interests of my Indians as well as they public interests; on our arrival at the village it was found deserted by the women and children who had fled in terror on the approach of the troops. The men were still in the village, and when Gen. Hancock sent for the chiefs to come to him they came without any hesitation,---he asked them why their women and children had fled and they answered that it was in consequence of their fears; the men still remained and were willing to talk at any time. Gen Hancock then told "Roman Nose" and "Bull Bear," two of the principal chiefs of the "Cheyennes" that they must bring their women and children back and they promised they would exert themselves to do so. Gen. Hancock loaned them two horses and they started; in a few hours they came back to their village, returned the two horses, and sent word that it was impossible for them to bring back their families;---and then undoubtedly being under the impression that Gen. Hancock would punish them on account of the flight of their families and naturally suspicious from the fact that the General insisted upon having their women and children present, the horrors of Sand Creek still being before their eyes, they fled, leaving the village deserted with the exception of an old crippled Indian and a female Indian child, about nine or ten years of age.---It has been stated, by newspaper correspondents and in Military Reports that the child found in the village was white, and that she had been brutally ravished; that she was ravished is correct; she was found after the camp was occupied by the Troops and the question in my mind is still, by whom was this outrage committed. If by her own race it Is the first Instance I have any knowledge of.

     The Indian village consisted of 14 Lodges of Sioux' and 132 Lodges of Cheyennes. Immediately upon the Indians flight, Gen. Hancok, intimated his intention of destroying the village, which I protested against over my official signature, and a copy of which letter I have already transmitted to the Department. The Indians upon their flight were by order of Gen. Hancock pursued by Gen. Custer with his cavalry and in a communication he forwarded to Gen. Hancock he stated that the Cheyenne Indians had fled south, while he was continuing on the Sioux' trail which led toward the north; at a later date he reported that the Sioux' upon crossing the Smoky Hill had burned a Ranche and killed three men, upon the receipt of which communication Gen. Hancock immediately ordered the intire village to be destroyed; notwithstanding there was no evidence that the Cheyennes had committed any overt act since their flight. Their village was destroyed as well as the Sioux. In a former communication I have forwarded an inventory of the property contained in both villages, although the Sioux' are not included in my agency. About the time of the destruction of the village; six Cheyenne Indians while crossing the Arkansas River on foot above Fort Dodge were attacked by a command of Cavalry and killed; nothwithstanding all these facts there is as yet no evidence that any of these persecuted Indians of my Agency, have in any manner retaliated; since their flight they have remained far south of the Arkansas River and the only Indians who have committed any depredations since that time have been the Kiowa's; the same Indians whom Gen Hancock proposed to "arm, feed, clothe and mount"; for the purpose of making war upon these poor persecuted Cheyennes whom from the time of the base treachery practised Sand Creek by our own race should have the sympathy of all humanity.

     Gen. Hancock has declared war upon the Cheyennes, and ordered all to be shot who make their appearance north of the Arkansas or south of the Plate Rivers; the question is what have these Indians done to cause such action and it is to be hoped that the Department will have such question answered.

June 15 --- Letter from Major Kidd to Brevet Brigadier General Chauncey McKeever, Assistant Adjutant General, Department of the Missouri:

     In obedience to the enclosed order, I have carefully examined the flour and other subsistence stores referred to in the enclosed Inventory and Inspection Report of Capt and Bvt. Major Asbury, and have the honor to submit the following report.

     This Flour is the cakes and lumps left after sifting the lot of flour, inspected and ordered to be sifted, by Bvt Major Martin referred to by Bvt. Brig. Genl. M.R. Morgan C.C.S. Dept of the Missouri

     The flour corresponds with the amount in the Inventory and is rotten and utterly worthless. I respectfully recommend the disposition of the flour as recommended by Bvt Major Asbury.

     I also enclose and respectfully forward proceedings of a Board of Survey, covering all the Articles in the Inventory.

     I am satisfied Lieut and Bvt Capt I.A. Heim 3d Infantry, should be relieved of all responsibility for the damage to these stores.

Letter from Major Kidd to Lieutenant T.B. Weir, Acting Assistant Adjutant General, District of the Upper Arkansas:

     The Wood Contractor at this Post has applied for a guard of ten [10] men, for wood cutters and an escort of ten [10] men for his train.

     A detachment of ten [10] men is stationed at Coon Creek; twenty five [25] at Fort Zarah, and ten [10] at the quarry, reducing the strength of the garrison for duty to 130.

     Twenty and sometimes thirty [30] of these are absent on escort duty for the Overland Mail. In my judgement no guard or escort can be furnished the Wood Contractor, without reducing the strength of the garrison below what is safe or prudent: es-pecially as occasional escorts for Post trains further reduce the strength of the garrison, to the extent of twenty [20] or thirty [30]

     In view of these facts, I respectfully ask instructions, as to furnishing a guard or escort for the Wood Contractor.

     If the Government is not bound by contract to protect these men, I respectfully suggest the Contractor be required to do so, by employing a few additional men

June 21 --- Letter from Major Kidd to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri:

     I respectfully submit the following report of Indian hostilities

     Two men [Citizens] travelling with Dyke's Train were attacked by Fifteen [15] Indians on the 17th Inst. when one mile east of Plum Creek, on the Fort Harker and Fort Zarah road: One was killed and the other severely wounded.

     The men were mounted on mules and had gone In advance of the train, a half mile: Both the mules were captured by the Indians

     The night previous, the Stock of the Overland Mail Company at Plum Creek, was captured, doubtless by the same band of Indians

     I have no knowledge, what tribe this band belongs to.

     A few days since about the same number of Indians crossed the road ten miles west of this Post, going North. Captain Nolan with 25 men of Co "A" 20th Cavalry followed them until dark when further pursuit was impracticable.

June 27 --- Letter from Major Kidd to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri:

     I respectfully report, that about 11 OClock on the night of the 25th inst, the Indians made a demonstration against this Post, and attempted to stampede the horses of Co "A" 10th Cavalry. They were promptly fired upon by the Guard, and fled.

     The night was so dark, I deemed it useless to attempt pursuit.

     I do not think their number exceeded Twenty [20] and this affair is only important, as showing their hostility.

July 1 --- Letter from Major Kidd to the adjutant general, U.S. Army:

     I have the honor to transmit here with Descriptive Lists of Deserters from Companies stationed at Fort Larned Kansas during the month of June 1867.

Letter from Agent Wynkoop, Fort Larned, to Superintendent Murphy, Atchison:

     Estimate of funds required for the current and contingent expenses of the Upper Arkansas Agency for the 3d & 4th Quarters 1867 viz.:

Pay[ment] of Annuity $1000.00
Pay[ment] of Agent 750.00
Pay[ment] of Interpreter 200.00
For rent of Storehouse & Office 600.00
For rent of Contingencies 100.00
[Total] $2650.00

Second Letter from Wynkoop to Murphy, same date:

     I have the honor to state that since my last letter, I have not been in communication with the Indians of my Agency; they are some distance south of the Arkansas River and up to the present time have not, according to my belief engaged in hostilities, but unless prompt action is taken by the Government they will necessarily soon be brought into the war, for the reason that the Kiowa's at present are engaged in open hostilities and the consequence will be that the Troops will soon take the Field against them and as has hertofore invariably been the case[,] they will not discriminate but be apt to strike the wrong Indians which will force these friendly Indians who are disposed and anxious to remain at peace, to make war in self defense; I therefore consider It of the utmost importance that these Indians should be separated, and those whom I can vouch for as friendly be brought under protection, while the campaign is being carried on against those who deserve punishment; although I believe that the whole Indian difficult in this section of the country can be settled on a more economical plan than fighting them.

     I have reason to believe that two of the semi-civilized Tribes of your Superintendancy, viz: the Osages and Kaws[,] have taken advantage of the hostilities existing with the wild Tribes to commit depredations and have the blame thrown upon them.

July 2 --- Companies D and F of the 38th U.S. Infantry, en route to Fort Union, New Mexico, arrived at the post. John J. Marston, Fort Larned's acting assistant surgeon, noted that "several cases of epidemic cholera" had occurred in men of the 38th during their march from Fort Harker. He requested that Major Kidd not allow the unit within two miles of the post. The request was denied. For two days the infantrymen camped some 500 yards from the fort. While still in camp on July 3, another member of the 38th, Sergeant Wort, was stricken with cholera. He was taken along when his unit moved out, but died on July 6, about 40 miles west of Fort Larned.

July 5 --- Special Orders, No. 93, signed by 1st Lieutenant Henry Romeyn, 37th U.S. Infantry, Post Adjutant:

     1. 2d Lieut H.G. Cavenaugh 37th Infantry will proceed without delay to Fort Harker Kas for the purpose of procuring Subsistence Stores for the use of the Post.

     2. Upon completion of the above business Lieut Cavenaugh is hereby granted Leave of Absence for Seven [7] days, to enable him to proceed to Fort Leavenworth Ks. for the purpose of procuring the property of Company "K" 37th Infantry, left at Fort Leavenworth, Kas. March 26th 1867 by Capt Jas. Thompson 37th Infantry, with permission to apply for an extension of Five [5] days.

     3. By recommendation of the Post Surgeon, the five thousand pounds of Potatoes, in a rotten condition in the Commissary Department and for which lit Lieut H. Romeyn 37th Infantry A.C.S. is responsible will be destroyed without delay.

July 6 --- The first case of cholera at Fort Larned was reported; the victim died ten hours later.

Special Orders, No. 94, signed by Lieutenant Romeyn:

     1. Privates William McNamara Co "B" 3d Infantry and Joseph Miller Co "D" 3d Infantry are hereby relieved from daily duty as Post Gardeners and will report to their Company Commander for duty.

     2. Private James Wainhoff Co "D" 3d Infantry is hereby detailed on daily duty as Post Gardener and will report to the Post Treasurer for duty.

Letter from Agent Wynkoop to Superintendent Murphy:

     For the purpose of properly fulfilling my duties as Agent for the Indians included in my Agency, I am obliged to remain at this isolated Post far removed from civilization, and it is utterly impossible for me now to procure the necessaries of life unless I have extended to me the privilege of purchasing from the Commissary. Therefore through yourself I would most respectfully request, that action be taken by the Secretary of the Interior to procure me the said privilege from the War Department.

July 7 --- Special Orders, No. 95, signed by Lieutenant Romeyn:

     The A.Q.M. at this Post is hereby ordered to expend for disinfecting purposes 10 bushels of lime.

July 8 --- Special Orders, No. 96, signed by Lieutenant Romeyn:

     1. The A.C.S. at this Post is directed, for Sanitary reasons[,] to remove and have buried, at least one-half mile from the Post, all Flour and Meats now on hand, which are unfit for issue and which have been condemned and ordered by a Board of Survey to be destroyed.

     2. Sergeant Lowell M Dow Co "D" 3d Infantry is hereby relieved from extra duty as Acting Commissary Sergeant and will report to his Company Commander for duty.

Letter from Major Kidd to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri:

     I have the honor to transmit herewith Charges and Specifications preferred against Private Baylor and Shand Co "D" 3d Infantry

July 11 --- Two more men at the fort were reported ill with cholera. One died.

July 13 --- Letter from Major Kidd to the assistant adjutant general, District of the Upper Arkansas:

     Private trains laden with valuable Government stores are constantly passing this Post with but few rounds of ammunition, and call on me for a supply.

     In cases where there seems to be a necessity for it, I have issued a small quantity to them, but I believe without specific authority. If my action in this behalf is approved I should be pleased to know if and in any event I respectfully solicit definite instructions.

July 17 --- Letter from Major Kidd to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri:

     I respectfully submit the following report of Indian hostilities in this vicinity

     On the morning of the 13th inst a party of about Fifty [50] attacked the Sergeant and nine men stationed for escort duty on Coon Creek, 22 miles west of this Post. A loopholed sod enclosure, I had caused to be constructed, afforded the men a secure defense, from which they repelled the attack of the Indians for an hour, certainly killing three and wounding seven. The public animals were saved and no men injured. Immediately after, the Indians attacked a Mexican train and drove away Seventy-five head of stock.

     The next morning [14th] about the same number and supposed to be the same band of Indians attacked 8 men stationed 15 miles north of this Post as a guard for the wood choppers, no casualties on either side so far as known

     On the morning of the 15th, doubtless the same Indians attacked Fort Zarah Ks, but were driven off with the loss of several wounded.

     They then went south of the Arkansas river

     From all the information obtained, I am satisfied they were Kiowas.

Special Orders, No. 100, signed by Lieutenant Romeyn:

     Sergeant Bartlett McNeill Co "B" 38th Infantry, having reported at this Post, in charge of escort for train loaded with Government Stores for Fort Dodge Kas. will proceed to that Post with said train, there being no troops at this Post that can be spared for that duty.

     He will return from Fort Dodge Ks with the first train for Fort Harker.

July 18 --- Four companies of the 18th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry arrived at Fort Larned. The companies of militia, mustered into duty on July 15 at Fort Harker, were organized to protect Santa Fe Trail traffic and crews building the Union Pacific Railroad, Eastern Division, in western Kansas. The day they were sworn in, several of the men were stricken with cholera. By the time the cavalry units reached Fort Larned, five soldiers were dead and another three dozen were ill. All of the sick were treated at the post hospital and recovered. One other man was stricken during the 18th's stay at Larned---the unit's regimental surgeon. His time spent tending the sick and dying proved fatal.

July 15 --- During the first half of the month, eight more cases of cholera occurred at Fort Larned, all among quartermaster employees. Four proved fatal. The post surgeon noted, "All public trains and detachments of troops passing have more or less cases of this disease; but all cases from these infected commands, when brought to this post for treatment, are treated in a quarantine hospital two miles distant from the post." He went on to report the adoption of several sanitary measures, including the instruction of troops on the importance of cleanliness, the moving of the quartermaster's employees' camp another half mile from the fort, and the disinfection of "sinks and all foul places" with "unslaked lime and strong acids."

July 25 --- Letter from Major Kidd to the adjutant general, U.S. Army:

     It is my painful duty to communicate the fact that 19 Lieut I.A. Heim 3d Infantry, Bvt Capt U.S.A. departed this life at Fort Zarah Kansas on the 24th inst, of Cholera, after an illness of a few hours.

July 27 --- Letter from Major Kidd to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri:

     I have the honor to report that Two [2] Companies 38th Infantry numbering 230 men, Lieut. Col. C. Grover, Bvt Major General U.S.A. in command, arrived near this Post on the 26th inst and departed this morning en route for New Mexico.

     Eight men of this command have died whilst enroute from Fort Harker to this Post.

July 28 --- Letter from Private Alonzo Ballard, 18th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry, at Fort Larned:

     [Fort Harker is] the most unhealthy place I ever saw. I believe the cholera was amongst us [there] for most every one of us was taken with diarrhea, vomiting and griping in the stomach. This country [near Fort Larned] appears to be quite healthy and I think we are clear from the cholera.

July 29 --- Special Orders, No. 108, signed by Lieutenant Romeyn:

     Private Samuel Lee Co "A" 38th Infantry will proceed westward with the first escort going in that direction, with a view of joining his Company now enroute to New Mexico, and will on reaching it, report without delay to his Company Commander for duty.

July 30 --- President Andrew Johnson signed a bill creating a commission to negotiate an agreement with the Plains tribes and "remove the causes of war; secure the frontier settlements and railroad construction, and establish a system for civilizing the tribes." The Peace Commission planned to meet with northern. tribes at Fort Laramie in September and tribes from south of the Arkansas at some point near Fort Larned in mid October. Members of the commission included Commissioner of Indian Affairs Nathaniel G. Taylor; John B. Henderson, chairman of the Senate Commission on Indian Affairs; John B. Sanborn of Minnesota; S.F. Tappan of Colorado; and three Army officers selected by the President. Johnson appointed Lieutenant General William T. Sherman and Brigadier Generals William S. Harney and Alfred Terry.

Special Orders, No. 109, signed by Lieutenant Romeyn:

     John Helm and James Richardson having been guilty of bringing whiskey into the Indian Country and selling it without permission and contrary to law, all the property found in their possession at this Post is hereby confiscated for the use and benefit of the United States.

     The mules and wagons will be turned over to Capt A.F. Rockwell A.Q.M., the mules branded U.S. and the wagon marked

     All supplies fit for that purpose will be turned over to the hospital and the balance used for the benefit of the different Companies now on duty at this Post and they will be confined at hard labor for the period of Five days and on being released will be ordered not to appear at this Post within one year from the ate of their dismissal, under penalty of imprisonment.

August 3 --- Letter from Major Kidd to the adjutant general, U.S. Army:

     It is my painful duty to Communicate the fact that Dr A.U. Squire Actg Asst Surgeon U.S.A. on duty with the 18th Kansas Vol Cavalry, departed this life near Fort Larned Kas on the 29th ult of Cholera, after an Illness of a few hours.

August 6 --- Special Orders, No. 111, signed by Lieutenant Cavenaugh:

     One Non Com Officer and Six [6] men of the 3d Infantry are hereby detailed to proceed to Fort Dodge Kansas as escort to Government train.

     They will be furnished with rations for Eight [8] days, to include August 13th 1867.

     On completion of this duty they will return to this Post with the least possible delay.

August 9 --- Letter from Major Kidd to General McKeever, Department of the Missouri:

     I respectfully request leave of Absence for Fifteen [15] days to allow me to proceed to Indiana and accompany my family to this Post.

Letter from Agent Wynkoop to Superintendent Murphy:

     I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of July 26th enclosing Letter from Commissioner of Indian Affairs with reference to the necessity of having a Storeroom; and in which he considers the rent as extravagant. In regard to the necessity of having a Storeroom I beg leave to make the following explanation---when I established my Agency at Fort Larned the Train of Goods accompanied me. It was impossible for me to immediately issue the goods, but a small portion of the Indians being in the vicinity---in accordance with the contract made for the transportation of the Goods, the contractors were allowed Ten dollars a day for every wagon while the Train was detained; therefore it was my duty to save that expense to the Government which I could do by unloading and storing the Goods.---there were two buildings here belonging to the Sutler[,] the only buildings that I could procure, and I rented these [at $50 per month each], one for Storehouse the other for office and habitation. Prices are much higher in this country necessarily than in the East. Probably the material and building of the houses that I occupy cost four times as much as they would in the East and although the rent appears exorbitant it is not so taking all things into consideration, and then they were the only buildings that could be procured. The reason that I retained the Storeroom up to the present time is this,---apart from expecting to use it on the receipt of more annuities, that with the Indians of my Agency it is impossible to issue all at one time, as they are much scattered and come in, in different bands and different times to procure their annuities and for the purpose of seeing that justice is done to all, I am obliged to issue to them the amount due to the different bands as they make their appearance. . . .

August 10 --- Special Orders, No. 113, signed by Lieutenant Cavenaugh:

     Captain N. Nolan 10th Cavalry will, with a sufficient escort, proceed as far as Fort Harker, Kas. or the Little Arkansas River, in search of deserters from this Post.

Letter from Major Kidd to General McKeever, Department of the Missouri:

     There are four [4] enlisted men in confinement at this Post, under charges requiring trial by General Court Martial, some of whom have been awaiting trial for over one month.

     Eleven [11] men have deserted recently from Co "K" 37th Infantry, a portion, at least, of whom I hope to succeed in arresting.

     I therefore respectfully request a Court to be convened at his Post for the trial of those in confinement and other cases which will probably arise.

     To insure a good record, I respectfully suggest the name of Lieut Henry Romeyn 37th Infantry, as Judge advocate

August 12 --- Letter from Major Kidd to the adjutant general, U.S. Army:

     I have the honor to request information whither I can be permitted to pay the clerk, employed in the Post Adjutants Office at this Post, an allowance of extra pay from the Post Fund?

     By referring to the records of the Post Councils of Administration, I perceive that extra pay has been allowed enlisted men, previously employed here as clerks.

August 13 --- Special Orders, No. 114, signed by Lieutenant Cavenaugh:

     1. The Provost Sergeant at this Post will corral all Government Trains and trains carrying Government stores, within Three [3] miles of this Post until a sufficient escort can be provided for them.

     2. Lieut J.P. Thompson 3d Infantry and Twenty five [25] men of the 3d Infantry and 10th Cavalry, will proceed to Fort Dodge Kas as escort to Government Stock, enroute to that Post. They will be supplied with Five [5] days rations to include August 18th 1867 and the Cavalry with Two [2] days forage for their horses.

     3. Private Lemuel W. King, Co "I" 3d Infantry, will proceed to Fort Dodge Kas with the escort enroute to that Post, and on arrival, will report to the Commanding Officer, with a view of joining his Company at Fort Lyon C.T. without delay.

August 20 --- Special Orders, No. 116, signed by Lieutenant Cavenaugh:

     Lieut J.P. Thompson 3d Infantry and an escort to consist of One Non Com Officer and five [5] men of the 10th Cavalry and two [2] men of the 3d Infantry, will proceed to Fort Harker Kas in Charge of two [2] prisoners charged with murder

     Upon arrival at Fort Harker, Lieut Thompson will turn over the prisoners to the Commanding Officer, District of the Upper Arkansas.

     The escort will be supplied with two [2] days rations to include August 22d 1867, and two [2] days forage for their horses.

     The Quartermaster Department will furnish the necessary transportation.

August 22 --- Special Orders, No. 118, signed by Lieutenant Cavenaugh:

    1. One Non Com Officer and five [5] men of the 3d Infantry are hereby detailed to proceed to Fort Dodge Kas as escort to a train transporting Government stores.

     They will be furnished with rations for five [5] days to include August 26th 1867.

     On completion of this duty they will return to this Post with the least possible delay.

     2. Corporal Edward Hayes Co "B" 3d Infantry is hereby detailed on daily duty and will report to the Commanding Officer for duty.

     3. Private Adolph Hunnius Co "D" 3d Infantry is hereby detailed on daily duty in the Quartermaster Department and will report to Capt A.F. Rockwell A.Q.M. for duty.

Letter from Major Kidd to Captain A.F. Rockwell, Assistant Quartermaster, Fort Larned:

     I enclose herewith letter of Gen. Easton C.Q.M. Dept Mo. and the endorsement of Maj. Gen. Hancock requiring the reason why the 18th Kas. Vols could get but one day's forage at this Post on the 27th day of July 1867

     Please inform me why you were unable to fill their requisition and all the facts connected with the matter.

August 23 --- Letter from Major Kidd to the assistant adjutant general, Department of the Missouri:

     In compliance with endorsement of 13th inst on letter of Bvt Major Gen. Easton C.Q.M. Dept of the Mo. requiring me to report the reason why the 18th Kas. Vols. could get but one day's forage at this Post on the 27th July last, I respectfully submit the following.

     On the 27th ult, when these troops applied for forage there were on hand less than four day's supply for the animals at the Post, and the A.Q.M. was eking it out in diminished rations to cover the time until the arrival of more.

     To deprive the Post animals of forage was to suspend work at the Post, and throw out of employment more than a hundred men: anxious as I was to supply these troops it seemed to me to do so further would have been a clear sacrifice of the public interests.

     For a more concise and detailed statement of the facts bearing on the subject, I beg to invite attention to enclosed note of Capt A.F. Rockwell A.Q.M.

August 28 --- Letter from Major Kidd to General McKeever, Department of the Missouri:

     I respectfully report that on the arrival of the annuity goods at this Post, on the 24th inst. I exhibited to Mr Carmichael, freight Contractor in charge of them, a copy of Special Orders No 177 c.s. Headquarters Dept of the Missouri, and offered to receive the goods and store them, but he refused to deliver them, alleging that his instructions were to transfer them to the Indian Agents, neither of whom were here. I then determined to guard the train carefully and defer unloading the wagons until the arrival of Col. Wyncoop, Indian Agent, and directed Mr Carmichael to move his train, which was in camp over a mile from the Garrison, to a designated place, near enough to enable me to protect the goods; this he refused to do, and ordered his employes not to aid in doing so, on pain of instant dismissal.

     I then sent an Officer with a detachment of men, and placed the train near, where it could be guarded; on which he abandoned all care of it, and has since refused to have any thing to do with it.

     This morning, Col Wynkoop returned, and I had an interview with him in regard to the disposition of the goods: He declined receiving or receipting for them, unless with the express understanding, that I would deliver them upon his order, to this I replied, that I could not do so until the order above referred to was modified.

     I have therefore directed the goods to be unloaded and stored.

     Fully impressed with the delicacy of interfering in their affairs, and anxious to avoid a collision with the Indian Agents, I have found it impossible to do so and obey my orders.

     No ill---feeling exists on the part of Col. Wynkoop, and he expresses the belief, that on a report of the facts, the Major General Commanding will be able to remove all misunderstanding.

Special Orders, No. 121, signed by Lieutenant Cavenaugh:

     One mule, the property of the U.S. having, by accident, broken his leg, thereby rendering him unfit for service, Captain A.F. Rockwell, A.Q.M. is hereby ordered to have him shot.




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